Information
  • Submitted by: Uganda
  • Topic: Green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication
  • Keywords:
  • Location: Uganda
  • Date of completion: 2004
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Action network
  • This voluntary initiative came from Green economy policies, practices and initiatives
Uganda Organic Agriculture Standards and Policies
Description/achievement of initiative

The Ugandan government has taken several important steps in transforming conventional agricultural production into an organic farming system which prohibits the use of synthetic inputs, such as drugs, fertilizers and pesticides. For example, in 2004, Uganda adopted the Uganda Organic Standard.
Source: World Resources Institute (2011) A Compilation of Green Economy Policies, Programs, and Initiatives from Around the World. The Green Economy in Practice: Interactive Workshop 1, February 11th, 2011



The Ugandan government has taken several important steps in transforming conventional agricultural production into an organic farming system which prohibits the use of synthetic inputs, such as drugs, fertilizers and pesticides. It was to promote sustainable agricultural growth. In 2004, Uganda adopted the Uganda Organic Standard. In 2007, Uganda adopted the regional standard, the East African Organic Products Standards developed by a UNEP-UNCTAD initiative. In July 2009, the government released a Draft Uganda Organic Agriculture Policy. Organic exports are an important part of Uganda's economy. Sustainable agriculture is seen as a means of improving people's livelihoods as it could provide significant benefits for its economy, society and the environment.

The outcome of the policies are as follows:


  • Between 2002-2007, the number of certified organic farmers increased 359% and acreage under organic agricultural production increased 60%;


  • Improved income and food security;


  • Reduced greenhouse gas emissions (conventional farms, on average, emit 64% more emissions per hectare);


  • Reduced agricultural chemical runoff into local water bodies;


  • Certified organic exports increased from US$3.7 million in 2003/4 to US$22.8 million in 2007/8;


  • In 2006, the farm-gate prices of organic pineapple, ginger, and vanilla were 300%, 185%, and 150% higher, respectively, than conventional products.



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