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Leveraging interlinkages for effective implementation of SDGs

The integrated, indivisible and interlinked nature of the SDGs requires an in-depth discussion of the inter-connection between the various goals and targets. There is a large body of analytical research and evidence from many different sources, supporting integrated policy making, implementation and monitoring. Furthermore, the interlinked nature of the SDGs is also seen in the scope of the supporting statistical evidence needed to highlight how and where sustainable development is achieved. Such approaches can have transformative impacts, if they can adequately exploit synergies and minimize trade-offs. Recognizing this potential, many countries have already set up, cross-ministerial coordination mechanisms for the SDGs, as presented in their VNRs. This is will be the discussion in the first panel. In the second panel, the importance of statistics and data to support the 2030 Agenda and the much-needed statistical capacity development to strengthen national statistical systems will be highlighted by key experts from different data communities.

Panel 1 (9:00-12:00)

Proposed Guiding Questions for panel 1

  • What needs to be done to ensure interlinkages among all SDGs are addressed when making policy decisions at all levels?
  • What are the best policy instruments to identify synergies and minimize trade-offs?
  • What are the best tools and initiatives to ensure the proper use of data in addressing interlinkages?
  • How all branches of Government, stakeholders and international community can be best engaged in ensuring interlinkages among all SDGs to advance 2030 Agenda implementation?

Presiding Officer:

  • H.E. Mrs. Marie Chatardova, Vice-president of Economic and Social Council

Moderator:

  • Ms. Minh-Thu Pham, Executive Director for Global Policy, United Nations Foundation

Panellists:

  • Mr. Debapriya Bhattacharya, Chair, Southern Voices and Distinguished Fellow, Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD)
  • Mr. Michel Sidibé, Executive Director of UNAIDS
  • Mr. Charles Arden-Clarke, Head of 10YFP Secretariat, Economy Division, UN Environment

Lead discussants:

  • H.E. Mr. Michael Gerber, Special Envoy for Sustainable Development, Switzerland
  • Ms. Irene Khan, Director General, International Development Law Organization

Interactive discussion

Panel 2 (12:00-13:00)

Proposed guiding questions:

  • What are the key challenges faced by countries in addressing the data needs of the 2030 agenda?
  • What have been so far the solutions adopted, including for harnessing the power of new data sources?
  • How can the use of data be expanded, including for the development of key policy instruments, by the media and the public?

Presiding Officer:

  • H.E. Mrs. Marie Chatardova, Vice-president of Economic and Social Council

Moderator:

  • Mr. Debapriya Bhattacharya, Director and founder of Southern Voice

Panellists:

  • Ms. Judith Randel, Co-founder and Executive Director, Development Initiatives
  • Anil Arora, Chief Statistician of Canada, Statistics Canada
  • Babacar Beye, Chief Statistician of Senegal

Interactive discussion

Biographies
H.E. Mr. Michael Gerber
Special Envoy for Sustainable Development, Switzerland
H.E. Mr. Michael Gerber

Special Envoy for Sustainable Development, Switzerland

In 2012, the Swiss Federal Council appointed Michael Gerber Ambassador and Special En-voy for Global Sustainable Development, entrusting him to lead Switzerland’s engagement in the international process of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Financing for Development (Addis Ababa Action Agenda) as lead negotiator.

Prior to his current position, he was Head of SDC’s Policy Division, which he joined in 2009. From 2006 to 2009, he was responsible for the Swiss development programmes in Afghani-stan and Sri Lanka. While serving in this function, he completed the post-graduate Pro-gramme on Developing Countries at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.

Michael Gerber joined the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs in 2002, as Head of Communication for SDC’s Domain Bilateral Cooperation and later Programme Manager for Ecuador. Before, he pursued several project assignments in Ecuador, Colombia and Mexico.

Michael Gerber studied Political Philosophy, Ethics, History and Social Anthropology at the University of Bern.

Mr. Charles Arden-Clarke
Head of 10YFP Secretariat, Economy Division, UN Environment
Mr. Charles Arden-Clarke

Head of 10YFP Secretariat, Economy Division, UN Environment

Charles Arden-Clarke trained as a zoologist and ecologist and worked for six years in the Political Ecology Research Group in the UK, primarily on the environmental impacts of nuclear power and of conventional and organic farming systems. Between 1990 and 1999 he developed and led WWF International’s Trade and Investment programme. This work focused mainly on the environmental impacts of WTO rules and negotiations, related ISO standards and the proposed Multilateral Agreement on Investment.

He has worked for UNEP since January 2000, initially with the Economics and Trade Branch on the effects of trade liberalisation on the environment and the relationship between WTO rules and multilateral environmental agreements. Since 2004 he has worked at the Economy Division in Paris, and from 2007 onwards on sustainable consumption and production (SCP). He headed the secretariat of the Marrakech Process and is currently Head of the Secretariat of the Ten Year Framework of Programmes on SCP Patterns (the “10YFP”).

Mr. Debapriya Bhattacharya
Director and founder of Southern Voice
Mr. Debapriya Bhattacharya

Director and founder of Southern Voice

Dr Debapriya Bhattacharya, a macroeconomist and public policy analyst, is a Distinguished Fellow at the Centre for Policy Dialogue (CPD) – a globally reputed think-tank in Bangladesh – where he had been earlier its first Executive Director. He was the Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Bangladesh to the WTO, UN Office, and other international organisations in Geneva and Vienna. He was the Special Adviser on LDCs to the Secretary General, UNCTAD. Earlier, he had been a Senior Research Fellow at Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS).

He currently chairs two global networks, viz. Southern Voice on Post-MDG International Development Goals – a network of 49 thinks tanks from Africa, Asia and Latin America, serving as an open platform to stimulate and disseminate high-quality evidence-based analyses for discussions on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and related issues; and LDC IV Monitor – a partnership of seven think tanks and international organisations, seeking to contribute to effective implementation of commitments envisaged under the Istanbul Programme of Action (IPoA) for LDCs.

Dr Debapriya is engaged in high-level policy designing and advising for the national government and various bilateral and international development agencies at home and in a number of developing countries. He serves in the boards and working groups of a number of national, regional, and international development organisations and networks (e.g. Governing Board, BRAC International), and in the editorial board of reputed journals (e.g. Oxford Development Studies). His recent edited book is Southern Perspectives on the Post-2015 International Development Agenda, Routledge, London (2017).

He holds a PhD in Economics from Plekhanov National Planning Institute, Moscow and had been a Post-Doctoral Fellow at Queen Elizabeth House, Oxford. He held a number of overseas visiting positions including Senior Fulbright Fellow at the Centre for Global Development (CGD), Washington DC.

Mr. Michel Sidibé
Executive Director of UNAIDS
Mr. Michel Sidibé

Executive Director of UNAIDS

A long-standing champion of a people-centred approach to health and development and a strong advocate for social justice, Michel Sidibé became the second Executive Director of UNAIDS on 1 January 2009. He holds the rank of Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations.

Mr Sidibé’s vision of zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AID-related deaths has helped drive recent progress in the AIDS response. The goal of having 15 million people living with HIV on antiretroviral therapy by the end of 2015 was achieved nine months ahead of schedule. Access to these life-saving medicines has continued to expand, with 18.2 million people on treatment by mid-2016.

Under his leadership of UNAIDS, more and more countries have adopted a Fast-Track approach through which the achievement of a set of measurable targets by 2020 will set the world on course to end the AIDS epidemic as a public health threat by 2030 within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Today, a growing number of countries are also adopting the 90–90–90 targets, whereby 90% of people living with HIV know their status, 90% of people who know their status are accessing treatment and 90% of people on treatment have a suppressed viral load.

Mr Sidibé’s leadership in calling for the elimination of new HIV infections among children has contributed to a 60% reduction since 2009 in new paediatric HIV infections in the 21 priority countries of the Global Plan towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children by 2015 and keeping their mothers alive.

His idea of shared responsibility and global solidarity has been embraced by the international community. This has encouraged an increased ownership of their epidemics by the countries most affected, with domestic resources now accounting for 57% of global AIDS spending.

Mr Sidibé’s commitment to advancing global health began in his native Mali, where he worked to improve the health and welfare of the nomadic Tuareg people. He later became Country Director for Terre des Hommes. In 1987, Mr Sidibé joined the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and went on to serve with UNICEF for 14 years, overseeing programmes across 10 francophone African countries and serving as a country representative in a number of countries.

Mr Sidibé’s work has earned him widespread recognition. He has been awarded honorary doctorates from Tuskegee University, Clark University, the University of British Columbia and KwaZulu-Natal University. Since 2007, he has held an honorary professorship at Stellenbosch University. In 2017, he was awarded the Emory President’s Medal in recognition of his work as a “passionate champion for health and humanity.”

In 2012, he was named as one of the 50 most influential Africans by the Africa Report and, in 2009, as one of 50 personalities of the year by the French newspaper Le Monde. He has received the Emerging Leader Award from the United Nations Foundation and the United Nations Association of the United States of America and is a Knight of the National Order of the Legion of Honour of France, an Officer of the National Order of Mali, an Officer of the National Order of Benin and a Chancellor of the National Order of Chad. He has been awarded an Order of Saint-Charles by Monaco.

He holds two post-master’s diplomas––in social planning and demography and development and political economy––from Pascal University, Clermont-Ferrand, France. He also holds a master’s degree in economics.

Mr Sidibé is fluent in English and French and speaks several African languages. He is married and has four children.

Ms. Minh-Thu Pham
Executive Director for Global Policy, United Nations Foundation
Ms. Minh-Thu Pham

Executive Director for Global Policy, United Nations Foundation

Minh-Thu Pham is the Executive Director for Policy at the United Nations Foundation, where she leads initiatives to help the UN solve global problems and brings together diplomats and thought leaders to find solutions. She recently led UNF’s effort to help the UN create the Sustainable Development Goals and taught international policymaking at Princeton. She was a strategic policy planning adviser to Secretaries-General Kofi Annan and Ban Ki-moon, working to reform the UN and improve U.S.-UN relations. Minh-Thu’s experience includes helping to rebuild countries after conflict, advocate for refugees, and combat global poverty.

Minh-Thu is a Women inPower fellow, a fellow of the Truman National Security Project and was selected a Term Member of the Council on Foreign Relations in 2007. She also serves on the Advisory Council for the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University where she also received her MPA. She graduated in 1998 with a BA in History from Duke University where she was a BN Duke Leadership Scholar. Minh-Thu was born in Vietnam and came to the U.S. as a refugee; she currently lives in New York City with her husband and two daughters.

Statements
Statements
Romania
Sri Lanka
Ten Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns (10YFP)
Together 2030