Leaving No One Behind: are we succeeding?
A central pledge contained in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is to ensure that no one is left behind.

Many people continue to confront barriers that prevent them from fully participating in economic, social and political life. These include women, children, youth, indigenous peoples, older persons, persons with disabilities, migrants, refugees and internally displaced persons. They often experience discrimination and exclusion, and as a result, suffer from worse health and education outcomes, face disadvantages in access to the labour market and experience poverty at disproportionately high rates. In every group, women and girls often experience greater disadvantages: reducing gender disparities is essential to leaving no one behind.

The experiences of certain countries show that it is possible to make significant advances towards leaving no one behind in relatively short periods of time. However, current trends do not point to a degree or speed of advance compatible to leaving no one behind within the time frame of the 2030 Agenda, including the trends in poverty (particularly in rural areas and low-income countries in subSaharan Africa), education and housing.

A generalized shift towards a development that leaves no one behind requires the transformation of deeply rooted systems – including some economic and political systems and business models – that are often based on unequal distributions of wealth and decision-making power. And to leave no country behind, international action must be coherent and support, rather than hinder, countries’ capacity to enact and finance their development strategies.

This session will capture the messages from the earlier sessions of the HLPF sessions with a view to synthesize the messages that respond to the challenge of fulfilling the promise of leaving no one behind. By engaging all stakeholders, integrating policies, strengthening global partnerships for sustainable development, and mobilizing the means of implementation needed to achieve the 2030 Agenda, the SDGs will be realized for all.

Proposed guiding questions:

  • Where are we in terms of achieving the overall objectives of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs for all people?
  • In which areas is progress most uneven and where are the greatest number of people being left behind?
  • Who are the furthest behind and are we managing to build the resilience and improve the lives of those people?
  • What have we learned on how best to improve the lives of the furthest behind?

Chair:

  • H.E. Ms. Marie Chatardová, President of Economic and Social Council

Keynote speaker:

  • Mr. Andrew Gilmour, Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Moderator:

  • Mr. Manish Bapna, Executive Vice President and Managing Director, World Resources Institute

Rapporteurs:

Thematic Cluster 1

  • Mr. Mahi Amadou Deme, Director, Ministry of Economy and Finance, Senegal
  • Mr. Achim Steiner, Administrator of the United Nations Development Programme

Thematic Cluster 2

  • Ms. Riitta Oksanen, Deputy Director General, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Finland
  • Ms. Alicia Bárcena, Executive-Secretary, ECLAC

Lead discussants:

  • Ms. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, Member, UN Committee on Development Policy, and Professor of International Affairs, The New School
  • Ms. Victoria Tauli Corpuz UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples
  • Ms. Sophie Howe, the Future Generations Commissioner for Wales
  • Ms. Sylvia Beales, Strategic Adviser, Gray Panthers (Stakeholder Group on Ageing)

Followed by interactive discussion

Biographies
H.E. Mr. Yinager Desssie
Minister, National Planning Commissioner, Ethiopia (tbc)
H.E. Mr. Yinager Desssie

Minister, National Planning Commissioner, Ethiopia (tbc)

H.E. Ms. Marie Chatardová
President of Economic and Social Council
H.E. Ms. Marie Chatardová

President of Economic and Social Council

Her Excellency Marie Chatardová was elected seventy-third President of the Economic and Social Council on 27 July 2017. Ambassador Chatardová is currently the Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Czech Republic to the United Nations in New York.

Until her appointment in 2016, Ms. Chatardová was her country’s Ambassador to France and Monaco, and its Permanent Representative to the International Organization of la Francophonie. Between 2013 and 2016, she also served as Permanent Representative to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

A career diplomat, Ms. Chatardová held several positions within the Ministry for Foreign Affairs. She was Director of Diplomatic Protocol from 2007 to 2010, and Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Sweden from 2002 to 2007. Prior to that, she was Director of the Communications Strategies Department, from 2000 to 2002, and Unit Chief of the Department for the Coordination of Relations with the European Union, between 1999 and 2000.

She also served in the Permanent Mission of Czech Republic to the European Union, between 1995 and 1999, and in the Ministry’s Department of Analysis and Policy Planning, from 1994 to 1995.

Ms. Chatardová was awarded Commander of the National Order of the Legion of Honour of France in 2016, and also Officer of the Order of Saint-Charles of Monaco in 2016.

Ms. Chatardová holds a doctorate of law from Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic.

Mr Manish Bapna
Managing Director, World Resource Institute
Mr Manish Bapna

Managing Director, World Resource Institute

Manish Bapna is the executive vice president and managing director of the World Resources Institute, a global research organization that works to address six urgent sustainability challenges: food, forests, water, climate, energy and cities. He served as WRI’s acting president from 2011-2012. Before joining WRI in 2007, Manish was executive director of the non-profit Bank Information Centre (BIC).

Mr. Andrew Gilmour
Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
Mr. Andrew Gilmour

Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Mr. Abdoulaye Mar Dieye
Assistant Secretary-General, UNDP’s Bureau for Policy and Programme Support
Mr. Abdoulaye Mar Dieye

Assistant Secretary-General, UNDP’s Bureau for Policy and Programme Support

Ms. Alicia Barcena
ECLAC Executive Secretary
Ms. Alicia Barcena

ECLAC Executive Secretary

Ms. Bárcena assumed office as the Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) on 1 July 2008. She had previously served as the Under-Secretary-General for Management at United Nations Headquarters in New York, Chef de Cabinet and Deputy Chef de Cabinet to the former Secretary-General, Mr. Kofi Annan.

Ms. Riitta Oksanen
Deputy Director General, Department for Development Policy, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Finland
Ms. Riitta Oksanen

Deputy Director General, Department for Development Policy, Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Finland

Ms. Riitta Oksanen is the Deputy Director General at the Department for Development Policy in the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Finland. Deputy DG Oksanen has previously worked at the Department as an Advisor, and in Finland’s Permanent EU Delegation as Counsellor responsible for EU development policy and cooperation. She chaired the Council’s working group on development cooperation during the Finnish EU Presidency in 2006. Before joining the policy department again in September 2017, she worked for 7 years as a Senior Advisor on development evaluation focusing on development of evaluation capacity and evaluation systems. Deputy DG Oksanen represented the Ministry in international initiatives aiming at stronger national evaluation systems in the partner countries in the global South. She was the President of the European Evaluation Society (EES) 2016-2017. Before joining the Ministry in 1999, she worked as a consultant specializing in planning, management and evaluation of development cooperation. Ms. Oksanen has a degree from the University of Helsinki specializing in marketing, business administration and economics applied to forestry sector. She is also a qualified adult educator.

Ms. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr
Vice-Chair of the Committee for Development Policy, and Professor of International Affairs, The New School
Ms. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr

Vice-Chair of the Committee for Development Policy, and Professor of International Affairs, The New School

Sakiko Fukuda-Parr is Professor of International Affairs at The New School. She is a development economist interested in human development and capabilities and the broad question of national and international policy strategies. Her current research includes projects on public policies and economic and social rights, and the impact of global goal setting on international development agendas. From 1995 to 2004, she was lead author and director of the UNDP Human Development Reports. Prior to this, she worked at the World Bank and UNDP on agriculture, aid coordination in Africa, and capacity development.

Her recent publications include: Fulfilling Social and Economic Rights (with T. Lawson-Remer and S. Randolph, Oxford 2015); The MDGs, Capabilities and Human Rights: The Power of Numbers to Shape Agendas (coedited with A. Yamin, Routledge, London 2015 Human Rights and the Capabilities Approach: An Interdisciplinary Conversation (co-edited with Diane Elson and Polly Vizard; 2011); as well as numerous articles and book chapters on issues of poverty, gender, human rights, and technology.

Fukuda-Parr serves on the UN Committee on Development Policy as Vice Chair, The Lancet-University of Oslo Commission on Global Governance for Health, and the boards of the International Association for Feminist Economics, the Center for Economic and Social Rights, and Knowledge Ecology International. She also serves on the editorial boards of Feminist Economics and Journal of Human Development and Capabilities.

Ms. Sophie Howe
The Future Generations Commissioner for Wales
Ms. Sophie Howe

The Future Generations Commissioner for Wales

Sophie was appointed as the first Future Generations Commissioner for Wales in February 2016. Her role is to act as a guardian for the interests of future generations in Wales, and to support the public bodies listed in the Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015 to work towards achieving the well-being goals.
Prior to this role, Sophie was the first Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner for South Wales and the only woman in a police commissioner leadership role in Wales. In this role, she led programmes to tackle violent crime and violence against women and girls, focusing on early intervention and partnership working particularly with health. She reformed programmes on substance misuse and offender management and led a review of women in policing as well the Force's work to increase recruitment of black and monitory ethnic officers and staff.
Sophie served as a Government Special Adviser from 2009-2013 providing policy and political advice on communities, local government, community safety, housing, regeneration and equality to the Cabinet and First Minister.
With a background in equality and diversity having managed the legal department in the Equal Opportunities Commission and subsequently as a policy adviser in the Equality and Human Right Commission, Sophie chaired and wrote the report of the Councillors Commission Expert Panel on increasing diversity in Local Government.
Sophie served as a County councillor in Cardiff - having been elected at the age of 21 she became the youngest Councillor in Wales. During her nine years as a Councillor she was Deputy Leader of the Opposition for a period, as well as a member of the Children and Young People Scrutiny and planning Committees.
She is currently a member of the Wales Committee of the Equality and Human Rights Commission and is Chair of the international Network of Institutions for Future Generations. She lives in Cardiff with her husband Ceri and their five children.

Ms. Sylvia Beales
Director of BealesGelber Consult (Stakeholder Group on Ageing)
Ms. Sylvia Beales

Director of BealesGelber Consult (Stakeholder Group on Ageing)

Sylvia is a successful analyst, communicator, author and advocate, with a track record in high level policy analysis, public affairs and political relations on the topics of inclusive social development, global ageing, social policy, social protection, gender, inclusion, and human rights. Formerly Head of Strategic Alliances at HelpAge Sylvia was the international policy lead for the 2008 revision of the African Union Social Policy Framework, co-manager with the UNFPA of the global publication ‘Ageing in the 21st Century, a celebration and a challenge’, and developed the 2013-5 editions of the Global Age Watch Index. Sylvia is the founder of the Stakeholder Group on Ageing, which represents the community of ageing on SDGs at the United Nations. She was one of five civil society representatives selected to speak at the 2015 UN General Assembly. Recent commissions include ‘Ageing and the SDGS’ for the UNDP and ‘Gender and the SDGs’ as a background paper to UN Women's 2018 SDG report. Sylvia is Director of BealesGelber Consult, a distinguished ‘Fellow’ of the International Council of Social Welfare, advisor to Widows for Peace and Democracy, member of and Strategic Advisor to Gray Panthers, and Strategic Partnerships Adviser to the Africa Platform for Social Protection.

Ms. Victoria Tauli Corpuz
UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples
Ms. Victoria Tauli Corpuz

UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples

Victoria Tauli-Corpuz was appointed as the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples by the Human Rights Council in 2014.

In the fulfilment of her mandate, she conducts fact-finding missions and reports on the human rights situation in specific countries, addresses cases of alleged violations of the rights of indigenous peoples through communications with Governments and others, promotes good practices to implement international standards concerning the rights of indigenous peoples and conducts thematic studies on topics of special importance to the promotion and protection of the rights of indigenous peoples.

She is an indigenous leader from the Kankana-ey Igorot people of the Cordillera Region in the Philippines. As an indigenous activist, she has worked for over three decades on building movement among indigenous peoples and as an advocate for women's rights.

Ms. Tauli-Corpuz is the former Chair of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (2005-2010) has served as the chairperson-rapporteur of the Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Populations. As an indigenous leader, she was actively engaged in drafting and adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007. She has founded and managed various NGOs involved in social awareness raising, climate change and the advancement of indigenous peoples' and women's rights and she is a member of United Nations Development Programme Civil Society Organizations Advisory Committee.

In her capacity as the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, Ms. Tauli-Corpuz has provided expert testimony before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and policy advice to inter alia the World Bank and the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO).

Statements
Statements
Lead Discussant remarks of Sylvia Beales, Gray Panthers/Stakeholder Group on Ageing
Ms. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, Member, UN Committee on Development Policy, and Professor of International Affairs, The New School
United Nations