Main Milestones
2015
Addis Ababa Action Agenda
Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
Paris Agreement
2014
SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway
2013
High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development
2012
United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, RIO +20: the Future We Want
2010
Five-year review of the Mauritius Strategy of Implementation: MSI+5
2005
BPOA+10: Mauritius Strategy of Implementation
2002
World Summit on Sustainable (WSSD) Rio+10: Johannesburg Plan of Implementation
1999
Bardados Programme of Action (BPOA)+5
1997
UNGASS -19: Earth Summit +5
1994
Bardados Programme of Action (BPOA)
1993
Start of CSD
1992
United Nations Conference on Environment and Development: Agenda 21
1987
Our Common Future
1972
United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm Conference)
Creation of UNEP
YouthXchange guidebook on climate change and lifestyles guidebook
UNESCO/UNEP, 2011
Every day, young people are exposed to numerous images and messages that promote models of unbridled consumption as the key to happy and fulfilling lives. In reality, however, the impacts of this unsustainable consumption are extremely harmful, contributing to climate change and other environmental challenges, such as rising sea levels, water shortages and food insecurity.

The world’s youth will have a significant role to play if we are to bring about the widespread behavioural change needed to shift towards more sustainable lifestyles and consumption habits. It is important for young people to understand that behind over-consumption lies increased exploitation of resources, rising poverty, widening inequalities and persistent conflicts, all of which will worsen with climate change and eventually will minimize their opportunities for a better and sustainable future. The poorest of the poor, those who cannot consume enough to meet their basic needs, are the worst hit by climate change. Most of these are young people under 24, who make up nearly half of the world’s population,
with most living in developing countries.

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