Main Milestones
Addis Ababa Action Agenda
Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction
Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
Paris Agreement
SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway
High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development
United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, RIO +20: the Future We Want
Five-year review of the Mauritius Strategy of Implementation: MSI+5
BPOA+10: Mauritius Strategy of Implementation
World Summit on Sustainable (WSSD) Rio+10: Johannesburg Plan of Implementation
Bardados Programme of Action (BPOA)+5
UNGASS -19: Earth Summit +5
Bardados Programme of Action (BPOA)
Start of CSD
United Nations Conference on Environment and Development: Agenda 21
Our Common Future
United Nations Conference on the Human Environment (Stockholm Conference)
Creation of UNEP
Climate Neutral Cities: How to make cities less energy and carbon intensive and more resilient to climatic challenges
UNECE, 2011
by: Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)

Cities and towns play a crucial role in the social and economic development of countries. Strong urban economies are indispensable for generating the resources needed for public and private investments in infrastructure, education, health, improved living conditions and, particularly, poverty alleviation.

The depletion of natural resources and the impact of a changing climate have become serious challenges to the full realisation of the socio-economic contribution that cities can make. These challenges entail huge costs, resulting in enormous inefficiencies in the use of local resources, with the poorest and most disadvantaged people suffering the most. In this regard, disaster preparedness - through risk assessments, participatory spatial planning, infrastructure maintenance and building codes - will be critical to increasing urban resilience in the event of natural and climate related disasters. Charting a path between promoting socio-economic growth and tackling environmental challenges requires the joint efforts of policymakers, urban planners and dedicated authorities, as well as the private sector and NGOs.

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