PARTNERSHIPS FOR THE SDGs
Global registry of voluntary commitments & multi-stakeholder partnerships
SDG Good Practices
And success stories on SDG implementation

Three years into the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), many Governments, UN entities, international and regional organizations, Major Groups and other Stakeholders, are planning or have initiated evidence-based stock-taking of progress.

What are the inspiring breakthroughs and success stories that are showing results and impacts? What are the good practices that can be replicated and scaled up? What are the gaps and constraints and how should we address them? Looking ahead, what steps should we take to accelerate progress?

To help answer these and other questions, the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) had launched a call for submissions of good practices, success stories and lessons learned by all stakeholders in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs and the results are made available in an online database of more than 400 good practices. To search the submissions including by sorting them by individual SDGs, click here and select the "SDG Good Practices" checkbox under the "Action Network & Databases" section in the left column.

This year’s submissions to the SDG good practices are still under review. Be sure to check this site regularly as more good practices will be released in the coming weeks.

*Disclaimer: The SDG good practices online registry provides an opportunity to Member States, the UN system and other stakeholders to showcase SDG-related good practices and success stories. Kindly note that the views presented do not represent those of the United Nations and that the United Nations do not endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or outcomes provided by stakeholders to this platform. The United Nations reserves the right to review submissions and delete proposed SDG good practices at any given time if any content/input is perceived as not aligned with the United Nations Charter and/or the principles and purposes of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Promoting Inclusive Sustainable Development to Improve the Well-being of Disadvantaged Groups in Vietnam

Over the past 10 year, HelpAge and local partners in response to the need of disadvantage groups in Vietnam has developed and tested the Inter-generational Self-help Clubs (ISHC) development model through the country. The ISHCs have demonstrated that they can serve as a strong mechanism for informal sustainable social protection for vulnerable households which enables higher income, better health and care and can be an effective platform to mobilize collective voice and to negotiate for rights and entitlements of disadvantage groups. The ISHC model has rapid grown to 1,535 ISHCs in 57 out of 63 provinces/cities in the country.

Partners
The ISHC development model benefit the entire target communities with various social, health, economic and development interventions, with a special focus on help those most in need like women, older people, PWD, ethnic minorities and the poor. The development of the ISHC model has received active support from large number of organizations such as VWU, VAE, VNCA, MoH, MoLISA, WHO, UNFPA and others. This close collaboration has managed to support the rapid expansion of the ISHC model throughout the country and the successful inclusion of ISHC in the National Program on Ageing for 2012-2020 and in Decision 1533
Sustainable Development Goals
Organic Farming in the GAP Region; a Success Story of Ilgin Village

The activities conducted during 2015-2017 in Ilgin Village. With an integrated approach a pilot project designed under GAP Organic Agriculture Cluster Project (This project is implemented by GAP RDA with technical assistance of UNDP Turkey) to contribute sustainable development through increasing the production of value added organic products, prototype models for land and water preservation, raise awareness on gender equality and increase the income of women farmers, build and facilitate cooperation among producers and market opportunities for the farmers.

Partners
The project implemented by GAP RDA and Egil Organic Grain Producers Union in coordination with Governorship of Diyarbakir, Diyarbakir Provincial Directorate of Agriculture and Forest with technical assistance of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP Turkey Office). The project is funded by the former Ministry of Development and Coca-Cola Company This specific pilot project is a unique project which was built on multi-stakeholder approach. A cooperation memorandum was signed among partners. The design and implementation of the activities mutually decided by the partners.
Sustainable Development Goals
Impact of milk collection in Pastoral Rangelands in the Sahel (Laiterie du Berger)

Sahelian pastoral context began in 2007 Laiterie du Berger (LDB) at Richard-Toll (North Ferlo, Senegal). LDB today collects milk from over 800 families twice a day. The major constraint is its seasonality. In the rainy season, the production is high allowing the collection of up to 6,000 liters per day. However, in the dry season, the volumes of milk can drop to less than 1 000 l/d. LDB also seeks to increase collected volumes during the dry season. To assist in this, LDB has increased the following: the density of its collection network; the number of circuits, and the number of farm suppliers.

Partners
The Global Agenda for Sustainable Livestock (http://www.livestockdialogue.org/) is a multistakeholder partnership with technical Action Networks. This case study belongs to Action Network Restoring Value to Grassland: Private senegalese small dairy factory with support of Danone communities (Social business) for marketing, through partnership with ONG for technical support and with pastoralists for milk-sourcing organized in Cooperative.
Sustainable Development Goals
Community-Based Animal Health Workers (CAHWs): Guardians for quality, localized animal health services in hard to reach livestock production systems.

In conflict-ridden South Sudan more than half of the population depends on livestock for survival. Public veterinary services infrastructure is dilapidated, access to animal health services severely constrained and endemic diseases of economic importance cause heavy losses to livestock producers. Vétérinaires Sans Frontières (VSF) promotes the Community-based Animal Health Workers (CAHW) model as a cost-efficient and locally available option to offer access to quality animal health services. The practice contributes to protect key livelihood assets and to grant access to food of animal origin, hence improving food, nutrition and income security of vulnerable populations.

Partners
The key beneficiaries of the CAHW practice are the agro-pastoral and pastoral communities. The key stakeholders in the implementation of the CAHWs system are national and international NGOs; UN FAO as the lead technical organization; Ministry of Animal Resources and Fisheries (MARF) on policy, regulation and quality assurance; the South Sudan Veterinary Association on professional perspectives; the Food Security and Livelihood Cluster on coordination of humanitarian responses; donors with keen interest in funding the livestock sub-sector; IGAD and AU-IBAR on policy dimensions and technical guidelines; and universities and research institutions on relevant operational research questions. USAID, FAO.
Sustainable Development Goals
ASEAN SDGs Frontrunner Cities Programme

The ASEAN SDGs Frontrunner Cities Programme (SDGs-FC) is a new initiative under the ASEAN Working Group on Environmentally Sustainable Cities (AWGESC) funded by the Japan-ASEAN Integration Fund (JAIF). The programme expects to raise the capacity and profile of 27 (t.b.c.) ASEAN cities, (comprising ‘SDGs Frontrunner Candidate Cities’ and ‘Model Cities’) to develop and scale up multi-dimensional benefit model practices/policies towards clean and green sustainable development. It will also actively catalyse the agenda of SDGs localisation to contribute towards the national voluntary reporting and implementation of the SDGs in ASEAN Member States.

Partners
National Focal Points (mainly environmental ministries/agencies) in 8 ASEAN Member States and participating cities.
Sustainable Development Goals
Generating disaggregated indigenous community-data through the Indigenous Navigator Initiative to achieve the SDGs

The Indigenous Navigator is a framework and set of tools for and by indigenous peoples to systematically monitor the level of recognition and implementation of their rights. By using the Indigenous Navigator, indigenous organisations and communities, duty bearers, NGOs and journalists access free tools and resources based on community-generated data. The Indigenous Navigator monitors the implementation of: The UNDRIP; relevant International Human Rights conventions, including ILO Convention No. 169; Essential aspects of the SDGs; and Outcomes of the WCIP. The Navigator exposes important links between these frameworks enabling gap analysis by indigenous communities. The project runs from 2017 to 2020.

Partners
Target groups: Indigenous peoples’ organizations at local, national, regional levels; Development actors, including government, the HLPF, UN agencies, and CSOs. Final beneficiaries: Indigenous peoples and organisations. Respecting indigenous peoples’ rights enhances the development of greater advocacy tools enabling more inclusive and democratic societies & enhances local capacity. Methods of engagement: Through participatory workshops, community survey, rights sensitisation, training in data gathering & constructive dialogue with local & national governments, UN agencies and National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs). Innovative partnerships: The global partnership is innovative by bringing together local & regional indigenous organisations from three continents, NHRIs, INGOs & the IPMG.
Sustainable Development Goals
Gabel El Zeit Wind farm complex (Ensuring access to affordable, reliable and modern energy for all)

Gulf of Zeit is the biggest wind complex in MENA region with total installed capacity of 580 MW and about 3 TWh in three years’ production, which saving fossil fuel and reducing GHG emissions. It consists of 3 phases, namely Gulf of Zeit 1, Gulf of Zeit 2 and Gulf of zeit 3 with installed capacity of 240MW, 220MW and 120 MW respectively. The project started in 30th Sep. 2015 and connected to the national grid in November 2018. The wind farm complex applies a shut down on demand approach that provides a safe route for migratory birds.

Partners
The New and Renewable Energy Authority (NREA) own and operate Gulf of Zeit wind farm. The Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA) sets the laws, regulations and guidelines for bird migration. The project was built by an EPC contract with cooperation with many international and national institutions such as the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA), FIEM (Spain Government) and the KFW.
Sustainable Development Goals
The 17 Goals Campaign

The 17 Goals Campaign is the first and the biggest national cross-sectoral initiative for the Sustainable Development Goals in Poland. It encourages business to contribute to the realization of the 2030 Agenda. The Campaign brought together a wide range of actors: companies, governmental institutions and NGO’s under the honorary patronage of the Polish Ministry of Entrepreneurship and Technology. It is an example how the national, cross-sectoral cooperation towards the 2030 Agenda can work. The Campaign mobilizes business community and other stakeholders to take action and create cross-sectoral partnerships for chosen Goals or include them in business models and CSR practices.

Partners
The Campaign brings together different stakeholders from business, government and NGO sectors to create cross-sectoral partnerships for chosen Goals and work together towards the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It is based on the premise that due to the SDGs wide scope and diversity, individual efforts, even if effective, will not be enough to achieve the SDGs. Each year, the Campaign brings together more than 300 companies and institutions.
Sustainable Development Goals
Goal Tracker - a visual tool for the Global Goals

Goal Tracker is a ground-breaking digital platform that enables countries and their citizens to visually track implementation of the Global Goals and related national policies. The platform can be tailored to any specific country, translating complex data on development priorities into innovative and accessible information. The first SDG portal which was developed for the Colombian government was launched in March 2018. Similar portals for the governments of South Africa and Tanzania will be launched ahead of HLPF 2019.

Partners
Beneficiaries: Central and local government officials, international organizations, media, parliamentarians, civil society, the business sector and academia. Ultimately the main beneficiaries are the citizens through improved development outcomes. Implementers: In each country we work directly with the national statistical office and the entity within the country responsible for Agenda 2030 (SDG committee or alike). Other partners: We liaise with members of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data a global network bringing together governments, the private sector, and civil society organizations dedicated to using the data revolution to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.
Sustainable Development Goals
European Commission initiative on sustainable finance

In light of the UN SDGs, the Paris Agreement on climate change and the EU’s climate, energy, and environmental policy framework, the current financial system needs to be better aligned with EU policies and foster investments that support the transition to a low-carbon, climate-resilient, more resource efficient and circular economy, while avoiding further degradation of our natural capital and preserving financial stability. An enormous investment gap needs to be filled, which is beyond the capacity of the public sector alone. The financial sector has a key role to play.

Partners
Financial world at large: asset management, banking, capital markets, credit ratings, financial centres, insurance firms, investment consultants, retail investors, pension funds, stock exchanges; industry, NGOs, other EU institutions, EU Member States. The Commission has been advised, inter alia, by an external High Level Expert Group, by a Technical Expert Group, and has held and will be holding several surveys and public consultations. The implementation of the Action Plan has been a shared effort among Commission’s departments, especially by the Directorate General for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union, DG Environment, DG Climate Action and DG Energy.
Sustainable Development Goals
EKOenergy - the ecolabel for energy

EKOenergy is an international, non-profit ecolabel and a network of environmental NGOs. Initially launched in 2013, we aim to fight climate change, protect the environment and alleviate energy poverty. We chiefly focus on SDGs 7, 12, 13 and 17 but our work often targets other SDGs. We setup the ecolabel in the spirit of ‘Deeds not Words’ to effect immediate and systematic change. The ecolabel is a tool, working within existing market mechanisms, for people to find energy produced through highly sustainable means and contribute to financing renewable energy projects in remote areas of developing nations.

Partners
Alongside the ecolabel, EKOenergy is also a network of 40 environmental NGOs who form the board and maintain an oversight role. Our secretariat is based in the Finnish Association for Nature Conservation in Helsinki. We cooperate with over 55 energy sellers to sell EKOenergy ecolabelled energy. All the projects we finance through our Climate Fund happen with the involvement of local grassroot organisations. We also involve volunteers to translate our work into many languages. The secretariat annually hosts six volunteers through the Erasmus+ programme alongside volunteers from further afield such as Japan and China.
Sustainable Development Goals
European Commission’s “Circular Economy Action Plan”

As circular economy is a complex and far-reaching concept, in December 2015 the European Commission has established a unique comprehensive strategy, the Circular Economy Action Plan. The plan aimed to boost jobs, growth and investment while protecting environment and natural capital. It includes 54 actions covering the whole cycle of materials and products – from production and consumption to waste management and the market for secondary raw materials. As of January 2019, more than 90% of actions have been delivered. The Commission will reach full implementation within the current College’s mandate, in 2019.

Partners
The Action Plan supports circular change by involving economic actors, local authorities and civil society. In cooperation with the European Economic and Social Committee, the Commission launched the European Circular Economy Stakeholder Platform and its website – an open space where stakeholders can disseminate expertise, good practices, commitments, strategies. The Commission cooperates with EU co-legislators (European Parliament; Council of the EU) to implement the legislative actions included in the Action Plan. With regard to EU Member States administrations, the European Commission is leading initiatives to foster understanding and best practice sharing at policy level. Stakeholders are consulted throughout the policy-making process.
Sustainable Development Goals
Child Health Initiative: Safe and healthy journeys to school to reduce emissions and exposure to air pollution, enable active transport, and ensure safe roads

CHI was launched in June 2016 and is a partnership of leading organisations sharing a vision that by 2030 every child should enjoy a safe and healthy journey to school. With a focus on policies for sustainable transportation, road safety, clean fuels and vehicles, and equitable urban development, CHI advocates for and supports practical activities to ensure every child has the right to: 1) use safe roads 2) breathe clean air 3) an education 4) explore in safety 5) protection from violence 6) be heard.

Partners
CHI convenes organizations with technical expertise, advocacy, and a focus on child health, rights, and mobility, creating a global partnership. CHI is hosted by the FIA Foundation and includes UN Environment, UNICEF, WHO, Overseas Development Institute, World Resources Institute, Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, National Association of City Transport Officials, Global Road Safety Partnership, AIP Foundation, Amend, Eastern Alliance for Safe and Sustainable Transport, Global Road Safety Facility, International Road Assessment Program, National Center for Safe Routes to School, Clean Air Asia, The George Institute.
Sustainable Development Goals
EU Action Plan for nature, people and the economy

The EU Action Plan for nature, people and the economy was adopted in April 2017 as follow up to an evaluation of the EU Birds and Habitats Directives. It aims to strategically boost their implementation and realise their full potential to achieve healthy ecosystems, whose services benefit people, nature and the economy and improve their coherence with broader socio-economic objectives, thus contributing to SDGs 14 and 15, as well as SDGs 2, 3 and 8.

Partners
The Plan is the result of a comprehensive and participatory evaluation of the Nature Directives involving authorities, experts and numerous, stakeholders in all EU countries. Over 552 000 citizens participated in the public consultation. Recognizing the crucial role of local authorities the European Committee of the Regions has been closely involved in its preparation and the European Parliament discussed it before adoption. Each action is assigned to one or more specific actors: European Commission, Member States, Committee of the Regions and stakeholders and promotes participatory approaches to encourage full involvement of landowners, users and other stakeholders.
Sustainable Development Goals
Sustainable Cities Program (SCP) - Supporting the implementation of Sustainable Development Goals in Brazilian municipalities

The SCP is structured in twelve thematic lines that intend to offer knowledge to support policy and decision-making on urban sustainability. The platform offers a set of 260 indicators aligned to the SDG and a database with more than 300 Good Practices, references of successful public policies around the world. This contents are available on a open data portal - Sustainable Cities Platform – in which cities may monitor and compare its development in an integrated way. Monitoring the implementation of SDG at the local level seeks to promote public policies aimed to end inequalities, improve quality of life and well-being.

Partners
The program has the support of several society organizations, foundations and organizations such as UN-Habitat, UNDP, UN Environment, Ford Foundation, Local Governments for Sustainability (ICLEI), Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), Open Society, Brazilian Mayors Front (FNP) and the Brazilian Association of Cities (ABM). The Program has development partnerships for specific projects with the Bernard Van Leer Foundation and is now part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF-6), a multilateral initiative between UN Environment Program, the Brazilian Ministry of Science, Technology, Innovation and Communications (MCTIC), the city of Recife, the Federal District government and the Center for Management and Strategic Studies (CGEE).
Sustainable Development Goals
SDGs Local Monitoring – China’s Pilot Practice

This practice explored the techniques as to “how can a local community implement the SDGs and what transformation actions can be taken”, which local policy-makers confront when implementing the 2030 Agenda. Taking Deqing County as a pilot area, the practice produced valuable results on SDGs local monitoring, including a data-driven and evidence-supported approach within a geospatial framework, a cooperation network able to focus resources on major tasks, and significant guidance to local development policy-making. It is a proactive response to the United Nations’ call for follow-up and review of the global indicator framework for SDGs at national and local levels.

Partners
This practice was initiated by the Ministry of Natural Resources of China and Zhejiang Provincial Government, and supported by the National Bureau of Statistics. The major beneficiary is the Deqing County Government with about 20 subordinate departments, who developed the user requirements, provided significant data, aided indicator selection, and devised transformation actions. NGCC is the principal implementer, who led a research team with approximately 20 researchers from six universities and three companies to establish the overall approach, solve the technical obstacles, and complete the project. A group of multi-disciplinary experts, national and international, provided constructive advice through over twenty meetings.
Sustainable Development Goals
Breaking the barriers of displacement and protracted crisis through inclusive approach of solar livelihood improvement in Yemen

Yemen was already one of the world’s most energy insecure and water poor countries, with most of the country having lacked sustainable access to energy. The ongoing war has made the situation worse. Energy supply in Yemen for many years has been very limited due weak generation capacity, limited access, high electricity losses from the grid, and increasing demand. The Enhanced Rural Resilience in Yemen (ERRY) project intervention has addressed the above challenges by taking pathways from service delivery to livelihood improvement.

Partners
The intervention targeted women, youth and marginalized. Abbs and Bani Qais districts (Hajjah Governorate) and Al Feyoush district (Lahj Governorate) in the northern and southern provinces were respectively targeted. The non-governmental organization (I/NGO) were the implementing partners for the above intervention while working closely with target beneficiaries.
Sustainable Development Goals
Equipping Professionals for Supporting LGBT Refugees

‘Epsilon’ Project, was one of the most prominent LGTBI-led projects in Europe which aimed at improving the lives of LGBTI refugees and migrants. Within this framework, an educational programme was developed, intended for professionals and volunteers working with migrants and refugees across Europe. \r\nEPSILON is the first project in Europe truly led by an independent user advisory group consisting of LGBTI migrants, refugees and asylum seekers and professionals from the UK and Europe. The project seeks to fill the information gap about the situation of LGBTI refugees and asylum seekers in refugee camps, detention centers and the community.

Partners
Epsilon is developed and delivered in partnership with 4 European partners with experience in engaging with marginalized and disadvantaged groups namely; Anziani e Non Solo (Italy), the Family and Childcare Centre (Greece) Movisie, the Centre for social development (Netherlands) and the Center for Advancement of Research and Development in Educational Technology (CARDET) (Cyprus). IARS International Institute was acting as the coordinator. All partners established an Epsilon Advisory Board in their countries ensuring the smoothly implementation of the programme.
Sustainable Development Goals
The Electronic – Personal Health Record (e-PHR) to foster access to health and integration of migrants. Contribution to SDGs 3, 8, 10 and 17

The electronic Personal Health Record (e-PHR) was developed in 2016 to establish a more comprehensive approach to foster health provision for migrants arriving in Europe, and to facilitate follow-up and continuity of care. The product was requested by the European Commission - General Directorate for Health and Food Safety (EC-DG SANTE), in the context of large numbers of new arrivals to the region, challenging domestic health systems and demonstrating the need to expedite implementation of EU directives regarding cross-border care and data sharing. The e-PHR is a resource for Health Professionals aiding health assessments and medical follow ups for new migrants.

Partners
Co-funded under the amended EU Third Health Programme (2014-2020) of the European Commission’s Directorate General for Health and Food Safety (DG SANTE), the e-PHR has been implemented with support by IOM in Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Greece, Italy, Slovenia, and Serbia. The action also benefitted from the partnership with the European Center for Disease Control, WHO, UNFPA, UNAIDS, and ICRC.
Sustainable Development Goals
Income Generating Activity and Life Planning Program to Support AIDS Orphans to Contribute to SDGs Goal 1, 3, 4 and 5

Our practice supports HIV+ single mothers raising AIDS orphans in Uganda and Kenya by offering two programs: the income generating program and life planning program. There are 12.2 million AIDS orphans worldwide, 83% of whom are in Sub-Sahara Africa. Although antiretroviral drugs have reduced AIDS-related deaths, HIV+ single mothers who have lost their spouses tend to live in poverty, which creates a cycle of poverty for their children, who often fail to complete compulsory education, attain life skills and cultivate careers. We have been tackling these issues by providing our programs to 1,906 children in 235 households since 2016.

Partners
Our programs are implemented in collaboration with four local partner NGOs in Kenya and Uganda, located in four regions. Key stakeholders are beneficiaries (HIV+ single mothers and their children), HIV/AIDS youth groups, health centers in the affected communities, local government offices and departments such as the Children Office, Department of Agriculture, Livestock Office and District Forest Office. Local primary and secondary schools are also important stakeholders. Both individual and corporate donors as well as the Japanese government and private foundations are indispensable to make the programs financially sustainable.
Sustainable Development Goals
The Counter-Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC) (https://www.ctdatacollaborative.org/). Contribution to SDGs 5, 8 and 16.

In 2017, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) launched the Counter-Trafficking Data Collaborative (CTDC), the world’s first multi-stakeholder public data portal on human trafficking. CTDC is a complex, innovative project leveraging technology to bring sensitive data into the public domain for the first time. It has been developed successfully with buy-in and support from leading anti-trafficking actors. IOM is scaling up the project to expand the number of contributors and data available, transform the data into evidence and ensure its use to improve policy and programming.

Partners
CTDC was initially developed by IOM in partnership with Polaris and Liberty Shared. Together IOM, Polaris and Liberty Shared hold the three largest human trafficking case datasets in the world. Following the successful pilot, IOM is now working with several other partners, including governmental and non-governmental actors, to include their data in the site. IOM is also developing partnerships with academia, the private sector, UN agencies (e.g. ILO, UNICEF and UNODC), NGOs, and government to put the data to use for research and other purposes aimed at eliminating trafficking in persons, such as mapping risk in global supply chains.
Sustainable Development Goals
Accelerating access to quality care for children with suspected tuberculosis through improved diagnostic strategies, in line with SDG 3 and SDG target 3.3

Accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in children is a major challenge. Most commonly available TB tests are done on sputum, which many children cannot produce; and childhood TB often manifests with very few bacteria, so tests need to be extremely sensitive to detect them. The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND), in consultation with the National TB Program (NTP) of India, implemented a unique paediatric initiative in ten major cities in India to improve access to quality diagnosis. This initiative lasted from April 2014 until March 2018, initially focussing on demonstrating the feasibility of implementing upfront molecular diagnostics.

Partners
This initiative was developed by FIND in collaboration with the India NTP, funded by USAID (the US Agency for International Development) through the KNCV Tuberculosis Foundation under the Challenge TB Project.1,416 providers were engaged. Implementers included NTP officials, providers, and project staff in each of the participating sites. Hospital and laboratory attendants, NTP staff, parents and relatives of tested children were also crucial to the project by transporting the samples from the provider to the laboratory.Close to 94,500 children were tested, being the largest cohort of paediatric TB patients that has ever been evaluated in India.
Sustainable Development Goals
Evidence Based, Low Carbon, Pro-Poor Advocacy on Sustainable Eco-Village Development (EVD) in Bangladesh, India, Nepal. Sri Lanka in 2015-18.

Evidence Based, Low Carbon, Pro-Poor Advocacy on Sustainable Eco-Village Development in Bangladesh, India, Nepal. Sri Lanka in 2015-18. The Project partners tested/demonstrated the concept in 3 villages in the respective countries, and published training manuals, case studies, CO2 mitigation calculation, policy briefs, videos for promote replications, and inclusion the approach in development plans and national guidelines.\\r\\nThe background is that 1.56 billion people in South Asia struggle for access to energy, sanitation, safe drinking water, nutrition, and health services (UNDP, 2014). Climate change makes the situation worse, as by the 2050s it could decrease the cultivation area substantially.

Partners
The beneficiaries: 3-6 villages in 4 countries. The implementing partners were: CRT/N Center for Rural Technology (Nepal), INSEDA Integrated Sustainable Energy and Ecological Development Association (India), Grameen Shakti (Bangladesh); IDEA Integrated Development Association (Sri Lanka). The project coordinator was DIB, Danish International Human Settlement Service. The international outreach: INFORSE - International Network for Sustainable Energy. Regional outreach: CANSA and INFORSE-South Asia hosted by INSEDA, India. The Project financed by CISU/ Danida. Statements on "what the villagers want?" and series of case studies, success stories, planning matrices, videos showing the stakeholders perspectives.
Sustainable Development Goals
Water in the World We Want: A project addressing the challenge of producing critical evidence under data-limited conditions for water-related policies through developing, testing, and implementing SDG 6 Policy Support System (SDG-PSS)

Although a formidable challenge for many countries, achieving SDG 6 by 2030 through successful water and sanitation management will be a foundation to achieve many other SDGs directly or indirectly. Effective planning and policy implementation through strengthening and realigning enabling environments are critical to driving success in the water sector. However, evidence and appropriate data for policymakers and development actors to make this happen is missing, overlapping or even fragmented in many countries. The project “Water in the World We Want” addressed the challenge of producing critical evidence for water-related policies by developing SDG 6 Policy Support System (SDG-PSS).

Partners
The project was jointly implemented by United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health; United Nations Office for Sustainable Development; Korea Environment Corporation; Ministry of Environment, Republic of Korea; Instituto Costarricense de Acueductos y Alcantarillados, Costa Rica; Ministerio de Ambiente y Energía, Costa Rica; National Development Planning Commission, Ghana; Water Research Institute, Ghana; Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources, Pakistan; Ministry of Planning, Development and Reforms, Pakistan; National Research Institute for Rural Engineering, Water, and Forestry, Tunisia; and Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Ressources Hydrauliques et de la Pêche, Tunisia.
Sustainable Development Goals
Children and Healthy Communities, Sustainable Future - Goal 3

Developed in a partnership between INMED Brasil, ENGIE Foundation and ENGIE Brasil, the program improved the quality of life of children and their communities through participatory education on preventive health, nutrition and hygiene. It treats children with intestinal parasitic infection and anemia, providing biomedical diagnostics, treatment and training to their teachers and families. 63% of the local population live in rural areas and face social vulnerability. Only 20% have access to tap water and 14% don’t have bathrooms at home. The program takes place during a year but its trainings become a legacy for the region where the activities occur.

Partners
Beneficiaries: 32 municipal schools; 4,351 children and almost 10.000 members of their families; 10.000 community members; 311 teachers, community health agents and school canteen workers. Implementers: NGO INMED Brasil (program implementation); ENGIE Foundation and ENGIE Brasil (sponsors). Institutions: Health and Educational Municipal Secretaries, The management team from the school called José Simião highlighted the treatment offered to the students. “Before, the students slept in the classroom, […] the parents […] didn’t understand why they were always so tired. This situation changed after the treatment. Children are more agitated, alert and participative in class. It was a great improvement to the school”.
Sustainable Development Goals
The Common Good Project: Generating authentic partnerships for social impact

To stimulate social practices and promoting greater integration of society, through solidarity and social welfare, the City of Juiz de Fora carries out the "Common Good" project. The project was born in 2013, amid the discredit of the population in the political class and seeks citizen engagement in government practices. On a permanent basis, the initiative seeks partnerships that assist in the execution of social actions in favor of vulnerable population. Over five years, the project has already carried out around 300 actions and benefited thousands of people, with the support of private and public partners.

Partners
The "Common Good" invests in social impact actions , through partnerships with public and private companies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), to raise awareness or benefit philanthropic institutions, assisted by social programs and the population in general . The main instrument for building partnerships and engaging is communication, which runs through the social, institutional and internal spheres, generating spontaneous media in large-scale vehicles in the city and in social networks. Any agent, whether an individual or an institution, can become a partner in the project and offer its services or products.
Sustainable Development Goals
Indian Road Safety Campaign, Solve

Every year India loses more than 1.4 lakh people due to road-crashes with more than 60% of them being in the age-group 15-34 years as per Indian Central Govt. As of 2018- WHO Global Status Report on Road Safety, Road crashes are the leading cause of death among the youth (5-29 years of age) in the world with India being the table-topper across the globe with more than 3 lakh road crash fatalities. Indian Road Safety Campaign, Solve in India works with a vision to make Indian roads safer via youth-led community driven multi-sectoral initiative.

Partners
Key Stakeholders: Government and Policy Makers, Youth, Community, NGOs, Civic Societies, Academic Institution, Corporates, Enforcement Authorities\r\n \r\n \r\nKey Partnerships: Central Govt: Ministry of Road Transport and Highways, Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports, Ministry of Human Resource Development), State Govt: Maharashtra Govt, UP Government, Haryana Govt, International Organizations: WHO and UN (UNITAR), Corporates: Ford, Shell, Mercedes, Vodafone etc , Academic Institutions: Premier Tech, Law, Medical Colleges in India and abroad like MIT, IITs, AIIMS etc, NGOs: Savelife Foundation, ArriveSafe and 50+ NGOs
Sustainable Development Goals
Núcleo ODS -Objetivo de Desenvolvimento Sustentável

O Núcleo dos objetivos de desenvolvimento sustentável visa conscientizar e mobilizar as organizações do 1º, 2º e 3º Setor, assim como a comunidade acadêmica e do entorno do campus no desenvolver dos ODS, em especial nos municípios de atuação da Univali. O Núcleo prevê atividades práticas de caráter multidisciplinar, a fim de incluir os alunos no desenvolvimento de assessoria, consultoria, ações instrutiva, executiva e documental relacionada à implementação dos ODS da ONU, junto aos Municípios de abrangência da UNIVALI e com entidades de todos os setores.

Partners
O público alvo corresponde a docentes e discente da Universidade; Setor Público; Setor Privado (empresas); Organizações da sociedade civil – ONGs; comunidade. O projeto tem como parceiros o Movimento Estadual Nós Podemos Santa Catarina; Prefeituras locais; Fundação do Meio Ambiente de Santa Catarina; Escolas públicas e privadas no entorno da universidade; Programas de Mestrado e Doutorado da Universidade.
Sustainable Development Goals
Bogota's Transparency Index

The Veeduría Distrital of Bogota is an autonomous preventive control agency that analyses, investigates and seeks to prevent administrative inefficiencies and corruption risks in the City´s governmental agencies. The scope of work of this agency merges an oversight function with the capacities of an ombudsman. Bogotá’s Transparency Index (ITB) is a tool lead by the Veeduria Distrital since 2016 in alliance with the private sector and civil society, which identifies flaws in institutional practices of public authorities that enable corruption risks, and measures such risks but also identifies good practices and actions that will tackle such risks.

Partners
The Index is a tool first conceived by Transparency International for all countries. However, this is the first time that the Index is applied for a major capital City. This exercise comes from a partnership between the Veeduria Distrital (public sector), Transparency International-Chapter Colombia (civil society) and Bogota’s Chamber of Commerce and Probogota Region (private foundation). This partnership translates in a commitment bigger than the ITB’s measurement, as it seeks to provide support and assistance for all agencies of the City to strengthen their efforts on anti-corruption and scale up their efforts on transparency and public integrity.
Sustainable Development Goals
Integrated approach to support the localization of the 2030 Agenda by subnational governments in Mexico.

This ongoing practice aims to strengthen the implementation of the 17 SDGs by local governments. It was initiated through a collaboration between the UNDP Mexico Office and the Office of the President of Mexico, which, in 2017, set out to promote the localization of the 2030 Agenda by state and municipal governments. Over the course of 2018, the scope of the practice expanded by, for example, including capacity building of local governments in the field of integrating the sustainable development approach into their strategic planning frameworks and instruments.

Partners
Main beneficiaries: state and municipal governments. Several tools and services developed have benefitted all state governments (support for the creation and operationalization of the “2030 Agenda follow-up and implementation commissions”). Others have been developed as part of collaborations with specific local governments. These collaborations are financed directly by the local governments. Examples of key partners: (a) Office of the Presidency: Creation and operationalization of “2030 Agenda follow-up and implementation commissions”; (b) GIZ: organization of seminars for local government staff on how to strengthen local planning and monitoring practices by adopting a sustainable development approach.
Sustainable Development Goals
Q500: A Strategy for The Territorialization of the City Prosperity Index (CPI) in Querétaro

Q500 is a strategy for the integral and sustainable development of the Municipality of Querétaro planned until 2031, date of the 500th anniversary of the foundation of the city.\\r\\nFrom 2016 to 2018, the Municipal Planning Institute of Querétaro (IMPLAN), in collaboration with UN-Habitat, elaborated the strategy of the criteria of metropolitan and long-term vision and the different exercises of social participation. Thus, the Q500 plotted a route to implement in the territory the Sustainable Development Goals and the principles of the New Urban Agenda, seeking continuity in public activities that contribute to urban prosperity.

Partners
The population benefits from the 878,931 inhabitants of the municipality of Querétaro, however, the proposals generated seek to benefit the entire metropolitan area, 1255185 inhabitants. The elaboration of the Q500 was a task of the Municipal Institute of Planning of Querétaro and a Base Team of UN-Habitat, who created a strong Social Participation Strategy as a transversal component, involving more than 4,000 people and more than a hundred organizations among them: international and local experts, business associations and chambers, academics, professionals, members of ONG’s, key citizens of the civil sector and, as well entities of multiple levels of government
Sustainable Development Goals
National Priorities for Development in Territories

Guatemala has 22 departments (states), divided in 340 municipalities, these are autonomous and have multiple functions according to law. The Secretariat of Planning and Programming of Guatemala (Segeplan) has the task of advising and training these local governments so they can create their local development and territorial ordering plans. Therefore, in 2018, Segeplan published the Guidelines for the Formulation of Municipal Development and Territorial Ordering Plans (PDM-OT for its name in Spanish) as a tool for introducing the national development priorities and the SDGs in local government plans.

Partners
Municipalities\\r\\nDelegations of Segeplan in each of the 22 departments.\\r\\nSponsors
Sustainable Development Goals
Promote SDGs business model from the local region to all over Japan

SUNSHOW GROUP is a small and medium-sized enterprise in the construction industry in Japan. We contribute to the acquisition of housing for people having difficulty in securing a good living environment, and support the creation of good local communities and town development with a high awareness of disaster prevention. We aim to make a satisfying workplace and build a sustainable corporate foundation spreading the idea of diversity within the enterprise. We promote women 's activeness in the workplace so as conduct working-way reform. We share our practical examples to companies and organizations throughout Japan through lectures and consulting

Partners
The main stakeholders are customers, employees and cooperative trading associations. Everyone involved through SUNSHOW GROUP's business is eligible. SUNSHOW GROUP's business works in concert with efforts to achieve SDGs and creates new value for all stakeholders. This activity leads to solving social problems. We also aim for partnership with companies, organizations and government agencies beyond the framework of our business, and we are doing dissemination activities so that this business model can contribute not only to SUNSHOW GROUP but also to the development throughout Japan.
Sustainable Development Goals
How Suzano’s Restoration Program transforms degraded, pastureland into regenerative, native Brazilian vegetation

Suzano, world leader in market eucalyptus pulp, has an innovative Restoration Program, which seeks to restore degraded habitat and promote environmental conservation of ecosystems in four out of the six Brazilian biomes (Amazon Rainforest, Atlantic Forest, Cerrado and Caatinga). In nearly a decade, over 10.7 million native seedlings were planted, starting the restoration process for 31,200 hectares. Also, Suzano’s preservation areas encompass over 925,600 hectares, 38% of its total area. As such, Suzano’s sustainable environmental management increases afforestation and reforestation in Brazil, ensures conservation of important habitat including its biodiversity and watersheds, and strengthens Suzano’s adaptive-capacity to climate change.

Partners
Given restoration’s complexity, where many skillsets and views are necessary, the Program counts on many partners. For each region in which the Program is present there is a diverse network of partners that includes NGOs (e.g. WWF, The Nature Conservancy), academia (e.g. UNESP and ESALQ), financial institutions and local SMEs. In this way, this partnership chain supports, promotes and innovates on restoration technology and methodologies seeking to improve efficiency, reduce environmental impacts, generate job opportunities and knowledge sharing to create specific methodologies for each of the biomes, considering their unique soil, water resources, climate and socio-environmental characteristics.
Sustainable Development Goals
Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR): a technique to effectively combat poverty and hunger through land and vegetation restoration.

Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) is a low-cost land restoration technique used to combat poverty and hunger amongst poor subsistence farmers by increasing food and timber production and resilience to climate extremes. Started in 1983 in Niger, FMNR is a form of coppicing and pollarding, drawing on traditional practices and sensitive to local variations. \\r\\nIn FMNR systems, farmers protect and manage the growth of trees and shrubs that regenerate naturally in their fields from root stock or from seeds dispersed through animal manure. FMNR is an easy, low-cost way for farmers to increase the number of trees in the fields.

Partners
All stakeholders including farmers and nomadic herders, men, women, children, government authorities, forest and agriculture agents, merchants, NGOs, traditional chiefs and religious leaders are engaged. The main beneficiaries are land owners and whole communities.\\r\\n\\r\\nFMNR promoters include World Vision, the Global Evergreening Alliance, World Agroforestry Centre, World Resources Institute and various NGOs and local governments. Tony Rinaudo, who pioneered this technique in the mid 1980s, has recently received the Right Livelihood Award. The prize money will be used to scale up FMNR and the Right Livelihood Award Foundation will also help in the promotion of this technique.
Sustainable Development Goals
Sustainable Cultivation and use of the Licuri and other native fruits - Community Association of Uruçú

The project was initiated by a community association of peasant farmers in 2015 in the arid and drought-prone region of Bahia, Brazil. The Municipality of Mairi, just as Brazil as a whole, is characterized by great social inequality and little investment in the countryside. The families involved in the project have little income. Because of remoteness of the community, difficulty of access and lack of job opportunities, youth emigrate to the big cities. The area has an abundance of indigenous tropical fruit trees which tended to be neglected and their food value potential often ignored. Through this initiative the Association is taking full advantage of the indigenous licuri palm and other native plants, and promoting their sustainable cultivation, processing and full utilization.

Partners
The project started with 30 participants, among them 12 women and 18 men with an age profile ranging from 18 to 62 years and 1 – 11 years of education. The Community Association has strong ties with the wider local community and has a written agreement with the Municipality of Mairi. Through the early success of the Licuri project, partnerships have been developed with a number of local, regional and national bodies which have helped to support the initiative and provide a sustainable market for products. PNAE (the National School Food Program) is the main customer of processed fruits. The local Town Council purchases the products. Up to date equipment was acquired thought the partnership with a faith based Irish Funding agency, Misean Cara. Partnerships with other SENA – National Industry Service, CESOL – Public Centre for Economic Solidarity, IFBA (the Federal Distict of Bahiat) and CPT - the Land Commission have provided workshops, skills development, support and training. The Federal University of Bahia in Salvador is engaged in related research on the Licuri palm.
Sustainable Development Goals
West 2030: cooperation for sustainable development

To solve the complex challenges that Agenda 2030 poses we adopt two important strategies: to bring the 2030 Agenda to the municipalities, and the use of robust data in the monitoring of SDGs. The project aims to territorialize the SDGs in the western region of Paraná through localization and monitoring, focusing on the elaboration and implementation of a Joint Action Agenda for development. The Agendas were constructed in a participatory manner and based on evidence (such as diagnoses of the social, environmental and economic situation, RIAs, data platform and modeling of future scenarios for the state of Paraná).

Partners
Donnor: Itaipu Binacional Partnerships: Fundação Parque Tecnológico Itaipu – PTI Other stakeholders as AMOP, CACIOPAR, FUNDETEC, IPARDES, CEDES, POD and the 54 municipalities of west of Paraná were engaged through several meetings with the local leaderships to build the Local Agendas towards the SDGs. The Secretary for Human Rights and Relations with the Community of Foz do Iguaçu Rosa Lima highlights that after the meetings, they understood the transversal nature of the SDGs and placed the Secretariat of Human Rights as responsible for monitoring the SDGs, it happened because they see human rights also with this transversal characteristic in public management.
Sustainable Development Goals
'Action Plan Against Poverty'

The program aims to ensure that vulnerable individuals and families have access to basic services (food, housing and utilities). A total of 20% of the Catalan population live at risk of poverty and 30% of minors under the age of 16 live at risk of poverty or social exclusion (Catalan statistics institute, 2017). \r\nThe project was fully implemented from 2016, when it was detected that, due to economic crisis, there had been an increase in requests for the provision of urgent assistance by municipal social services so that families could meet the cost of mortgages or rent, utilities and food.

Partners
It is an all-encompassing project involving different departments of Barcelona Provincial Council, representing the housing sector and social and environmental services, plus other agencies: official bodies (municipalities, supramunicipal bodies, the Government of Catalonia), private companies, lawyers' associations, financial entities and social entities. \r\nThe entire project is developed in network with the 311 municipalities of the Barcelona province. The programme is also based on coordination between different departments and sections dealing with social services, housing and environmental in each municipality.
Sustainable Development Goals
Generation of evidence based on the City Prosperity Index (CPI) in the framework of the project “Infonavit leading the implementation of the 2030 Agenda: housing at the center of SDGs”

The measurement of the City Prosperity Index (CPI) in Mexico, carried out between 2015 and 2018, pursued the objective of creating accurate knowledge of the prosperity conditions of Mexican cities, while delivering tools to local governments for analyzing, planning and monitoring urban policies geared towards the implementation of the Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development. The project was part of the strategic cooperation between Infonavit and UN-Habitat Mexico Office, comprising two phases: Phase 1: measurement of 153 municipalities Phase 2: measurement of 152 municipalities including the ‘Extended CPI’ versions for the urban agglomerations of Mexico City, Guadalajara and Monterrey.

Partners
The project was implemented by Infonavit in partnership with the UN-Habitat. This relationship was essential to ensure the project implementation with the support of the Infonavit´s Sustainable Development Research Center, which periodically reviewed progress and outcomes. The Secretariat of Agrarian, Territorial and Urban Development (SEDATU) and National Housing Commission (CONAVI) were important drivers to develop the conceptual framework for the methodological adaptation of the CPI to the Mexican context. The Institute of Statistics (INEGI) and the National Population Council (CONAPO) facilized information to develop indicators to measure some urban indicators. Municipalities provided information and feedback about specific indicators.
Sustainable Development Goals
UNODC provides legal aid to detainees suspected in terrorism cases in Niger

Since Boko Haram began to extend its reach into Niger in 2014, around 1,600 suspected terrorists were arrested. Facing a high number of cases, the Nigerien justice system and especially the Specialised Judicial Unit in charge of the terrorism cases has been under pressure. In January 2017, UNODC launched a twofold project in Niger. The two main objectives were: (i) to strengthen the capacity of the judicial anti-terrorism unit and specialized anti-terrorism chambers to effectively investigate, prosecute and adjudicate terrorism cases and; (ii) to ensure a facilitated access to justice in the context of the fight against terrorism by providing legal aid to detainees suspected of terrorism awaiting trials in Niger’s prisons.

Partners
UNODC worked closely with national partners to design this project. A lot of preparative meetings took place before the implementation effectively started. Moreover, one of the main partners under this project was the UNV Agency. The United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme has been partnering with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) since 1999. Indeed, this specific project employs 12 UNVs. One UNV Specialist based in Dakar is coordinating the work of 10 UNVs (legal) in Niger and 1 UNV, IT expert. Before starting their assignments, the 10 Nigerian legal experts were trained on how to deliver legal aid services, especially to terrorism-suspected detainees, in June 2017. The modules covered the Nigerien framework of legal aid, techniques on how to provide legal aid services, the rights of the defense, legal aid to vulnerable groups, and gathering information from the client and from the authorities in order to better provide legal aid, among others. During their assignments, they received further trainings including on the psychological aspect of their work. In January 2019, for instance they received an additional training on the interviewing techniques and non-verbal communication.
Sustainable Development Goals
The Regional Fit for School Programme supports Ministries of Education in Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR and the Philippines on national and subnational levels in developing national standards and implementing guidelines for WASH in Schools

In many schools around the world, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities and services are inadequate, resulting in preventable diseases such as diarrhoea, acute respiratory diseases, worms and dental caries in children. These common ailments negatively affect children’s ability to learn and reduce their well-being. The Fit for School (FIT) Programme, established in 2011 and running until 11/2021, supports Ministries of Education on national and subnational levels in developing national standards and implementing guidelines for WASH in Schools, based on the basic service level set out in SDGs 6 and 4. The education sector is strengthened in its capacities to take leadership in all aspects related to WASH service provision in schools.

Partners
The FIT Programme is implemented in partnership with the Regional Centre for Educational Innovation and Technology of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO INNOTECH). SEAMEO INNOTECH’s mandate is to promote development of innovative approaches and capacity development in education. \\r\\nThe FIT Programme provides technical assistance and capacity building to partner governments on national and subnational levels to support policy and programme development. On subnational levels, technical assistance focuses on strengthening implementation of school interventions. Through international and national collaborations with partners, such as UNICEF, WFP, and NGOs, the programme strongly contributes towards alignment of agendas and joint approaches.
Sustainable Development Goals
Global Vision | Urban Action: New York City's Voluntary Local Review of the Sustainable Development Goals

In April 2015, New York City (NYC) committed to the principles of growth, equity, sustainability, and resiliency through its groundbreaking OneNYC strategy. When global leaders committed to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in September 2015, NYC recognized the synergies with our local strategy, and established the Global Vision | Urban Action platform to use the SDGs as a common framework to both share our experiences and learn from partners in NYC and worldwide. In July 2018, NYC became the first city in the world to report directly to the United Nations on our local implementation of the SDGs through a Voluntary Local Review (VLR).

Partners
Linking NYC’s local sustainability work to the SDGs requires both external partnerships and internal coordination with key NYC agencies. Because the SDGs are a common framework that all stakeholders can use to discuss shared challenges and solutions, we formed extensive external partnerships, including member states, local governments, UN agencies and offices, city coalitions, civil society, and academia. Internally, we worked with NYC agencies to educate them about the SDGs and help link them to the external stakeholders to facilitate the exchange of good practices.
Sustainable Development Goals
Contributing to the reduction of all forms of violence through humanitarian mine action in southern Tolima department in Colombia

As a result of decades of internal conflict, landmine contamination in Colombia has resulted in one of the highest casualty rates in the world, has been an obstacle to rural communities to recover from more than 50 years of internal conflict and to sustainable peace and development. From July 2017 to July 2018, The HALO Trust conducted mine action activities in the municipality of Planadas in Tolima department, releasing land for safe passage and access, and contributing to long-term recovery and development efforts in conflict-affected communities, reducing the risk of violence and casualties in line with SDG 16.

Partners
This project benefitted rural communities impacted by the presence of landmines and Explosive Remnants of War in Tolima. Through survey and clearance financed by Norway, 101 people directly benefited from clearance and 1,625 indirectly, potentially reducing the risk of death in line with SDG 16. HALO also conducted Mine Risk Education sessions, directly benefiting 1,137 members of the community (key stakeholders to the mine action process), and directly contributing to SDG 16. HALO has been instrumental in the development of mine action in Colombia. It has worked alongside the National Mine Action Authority and local authorities to create National Standards and best practices, to support government’s efforts to meet 2021 Ottawa Treaty deadline.
Sustainable Development Goals
Accelerated Action for Impact (AAI): Improving maternal and child health in Kebbi State, Nigeria

Despite the huge investment in the health sector in the last 2 decades, Nigeria did not achieve the MDGs. At all levels, the Government is working with all stakeholders to implement interventions that will address system bottlenecks and rapidly produce results for women and children. Nigeria will need to increase by 9-fold the current rate of programming to change the trajectory for health indicators towards the achievement of the SDGs. Using data analytics through the AAI approach has galvanized effort and resources to be invested in communities with the greatest need solving problems that have the greatest impact on the health of women and children

Partners
 Regular coordination meetings and joint actions among Implementing partners (State MDAs – SPHCDA, MOH, MEBP, MoAgric, MoEd, RUWASSA; EU, GAVI, UNICEF, WHO, USAID and INGOs)  Traditional, religious and community leaders engaged in review and analysis of results & challenges  Innovative partnership with Jumu’at Mosque committees and establishment of Mama-to-Mama groups for demand creation and health promotion
Sustainable Development Goals
‘Women-led Climate Resilient Farming’ Model (WCRF)

Marathwada’s sustained drought has resulted in crop-failure, groundwater level depletion, increased climate-risks, food-insecurity and uncertain cash-flow in absence of diversified-livelihoods. These made farming economically-unviable for small and marginal-farmers. Women farmers face worst repercussions of climate-change. They have no ownership over land which limits access-to resources like finance, market, water and government services. Double burden of risks due to climate-change resulting in food and income insecurity and limited decision-making capacities leads to negative impacts on women’s health. Addressing complex issues of climate-change, gender-roles and impact on health and nutrition, Swayam Shikshan Prayog (SSP, hereafter) redefined resilience for small and marginal farming-households.

Partners
• APPI: Sakhi Food Secure Agriculture project, building-capacities and providing marketing linkages to 10,000 marginal women-farmers. \r\n• CCIL: Community Resilience Fund (CRF) to women-farmers to practice smart-agriculture. \r\n• GES: Provides CRF to women farmers to practice smart-agriculture. \r\n• Krishi Vigyan Kendras, ATMA, Agriculture department partnership for technical training, knowledge dissemination etc. \r\n• Huairou Commission: CRF. \r\n• MSRLM: Partner to train community resource persons who supports women-farmers to adopt best-practices, access-credit, and market-produce.\r\n• Misereor: Support for improving socio-economic conditions of women to build leadership and entrepreneurship as farmers and innovators.\r\n• VSTF: Partner for livelihoods initiatives to transform 1,000 villages. \r\n• Implementation of the Project/Activity - How the project/activity has been applied and executed. May include the initiation, planning and execution of the project. What monitoring mechanisms, if any, are in place. (max 500 word.)
Sustainable Development Goals
International Environment Cooperation and Business, utilizing the city to city collaboration

Kitakyushu has priority goals such as Goal 5 (Gender Equality), Goal 6 (Water and Sanitation), Goal 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy), Goal 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth), Goal 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), Goal 12 (responsible consumption and production) and Goal 17 (partnership) etc., and they are also the strength of the city. In this report, Goal 17 (partnership) among them is focused on, especially "International Environmental Contribution (International Environmental Cooperation and International Environmental Business), that the city has been working since long years ago.

Partners
-UNIDO -World Bank -More than 160 countries that have been engaged in international environmental cooperation -75 Asian cities collaborating in environmental international business (*1) -Ministry of the Environment of Japan -Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan -JICA (The Japan International Cooperation Agency) -NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) -IGES (The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies) -KITA (The Kitakyushu International Techno-cooperative Association) -Related Japanese companies with environmental and water infrastructure technologies (*1) Includes “the Environment Sister City”, that is specified into the environment field, the Kitakyushu’s original partnership.
Sustainable Development Goals
United Nations